Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC

2409 Omro Road
Oshkosh, WI 54904-7713

(920)233-8409

www.mypetsdentist.com

Abnormal number of teeth

Knowledge of the normal number of teeth is helpful but not essential for the recognition of abnormal teeth or an abnormal number of teeth.  Crowding from extra teeth, multiple missing teeth or the recognition of dissymmetry can be an indication of an abnormal number of teeth.  In each situation, dental radiographs are very helpful for the diagnosis of the condition.  An abnormal number of teeth may be clinically significant, functionally important or unimportant.

Supernumerary (extra) teeth, oligodontia (few teeth) and anodontia (no teeth) are all conditions with an abnormal number of teeth.  Supernumerary teeth can cause crowding and predispose the pet to periodontal disease, create a malocclusion or result in teeth grinding.  Supernumerary teeth are common in dogs especially of the incisors and premolar teeth.  Supernumerary teeth are significantly less common in cats compared to dogs in our clinical experience, however they do occur as shown below in clinical cases.

Missing teeth must be confirmed with dental radiographs to make sure the tooth is not unerupted or impacted.  Unerupted or impacted teeth can lead to dentigerous or radicular cystsThese cysts are typically nonpainful but they can be very locally destructive.

Some clinical cases;

Cat with supernumerary (too many) premolar teeth.

Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC.. View of right upper dental arch. Crowding due to supernumerary third premolar (S-107).

Cat; functionally significant supernumerary
right third premolar tooth.  This patient
was "teeth grinding".

Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC. Inside view of the supernumerary tooth (S-107).

Same cat as above viewed from inside
the mouth.

Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC. Supernumerary premolar (S-107).

Same cat as above opposite site.  This
symmetrical occurance of supernumerary
teeth suggests an inherited condition.
The supernumerary teeth were extracted
to avoid discomfort and teeth grinding.

Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC.

Dental radiograph right side before
dental extraction of supernumerary tooth.

Supernumerary tooth extracted. Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC..

Dental radiograph right side after
dental extraction of supernumerary tooth.

Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC.

Dental radiograph of left side before
dental extraction of supernumerary tooth.

Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC.

Dental radiograph of the left side after
dental extraction of supernumerary tooth.

The owner of the above cat was excited to report that the "teeth grinding" behavior ended after the supernumerary teeth were surgically removed.  She also reported that the cat seems playful, more happy and has developed a remarkable purr never heard previously.

Small breeds of dogs commonly present with teeth that appear to be missing that have failed to erupt.

Missing first premolar tooth 405. Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC.

This lower right premolar appears to be missing.

Dental x-ray of horizontal inpacted (405) tooth. Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC.

Dental radiograph demonstrating a
malpositioned, embedded first premolar tooth.

Surgical view creating exposure of impacted (405) tooth. Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC.

Photograph of the clinical appearance
of the embedded premolar tooth.

View of left lower jaw with the first premolar (305) missing. Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC.

Same dog, with the same presentation
on the lower left premolar area.

X-ray view of impacted (305) tooth. Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC.

Dental radiograph confirms the embedded tooth.

Clinical view during exposure of the impacted premolar (305) tooth. Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC.

Clinical photo of embeded tooth.
Check out oral cysts for more information.


Dog with abnormal tooth development.

Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC.

This dog had multiple problems.
Incomplete "twinning" upper incisor.


Dog with supernumerary upper fourth premolar tooth.

Mixed dentition of deciduous and permanent teeth: Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC.

Mixed dentition (baby and adult teeth)
with supernumerary left upper fourth
premolar tooth.

Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC.

Supernumerary secondary (adult) left
upper fourth premolar tooth (close up view).

Clinical view during extraction of an embeded fourth premolar: Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC.

After the right upper fourth premolar was
surgically extracted, the impacted supernumerary
tooth was exposed and carefully extracted.
Great caution is needed to avoid injury to
blood vessels, nerves or the eye.


Dog having persistent primary teeth.


Deciduous and permanent incisors and canines ("mixed dentition): Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC.

Persistent primary (baby) teeth with
secondary (adult) teeth is evident.

Mixed dentition (deciduous and permanent lower canines):Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC.

Persistent primary (baby) teeth result
in crowding and malocclusion.

Supernumerary Teeth= abnormal extra tooth.  Rottweiler with supernumerary upper incisor.

Supernumerary upper incisor: Courtesy: Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC.

The supernumerary incisor was removed to stop trauma to the lower teeth.

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